Bangkok Thai Cuisine

Bangkok Thai Cuisine dumplings

Falmouth’s restaurant Row has a wonderful new Thai restaurant – Bangkok Thai Cuisine. They have a bright charming location at 293 Main Street and also do a brisk take-out business. It is just a ten minute walk from the Palmer House Inn.

dining room Bangkok Thai Cuisine
Dining room.

The menu features seafood such as: Pinky in a Blanket, Shu Mai Shrimp, Shrimp Tempura, Crab Rolls and Steamed  Muscles.

“Steamed Mussels” are served in a aromatic Thai herbal broth with basil leaves.

“Pinky in a Blanket” is made by wrapping whole shrimp in a crispy egg roll wrapper and stuffing them with vegetables. It is served with sweet and sour sauce.

“Crab Rolls” are stuffed with crabmeat, cream cheese and onions.

“Shu Mai”, is stuffed shrimp and vegetables and served with honey soy sauce.

“Shrimp Tempura” is assorted vegetables with tempura and shrimp and it is served with sweet and sour sauce.

They also feature chicken and pork dishes such as: Crispy Rolls, Fresh Rolls, Chicken Satay, Chicken Teriyaki and Todmon-Fried Chicken.

“Crispy Rolls” are golden brown egg rolls that are stuffed with sliced vegetables and chicken and served with sweet and sour sauce.

“Fresh Rolls” are made of soft rice paper that are stuffed with vegetables and chicken and are served with peanut sweet chili sauce.

“Chicken Stay” is made by marinating the chicken in coconut milk and Thai herbs. The chicken is then placed on skewers and grilled. It is served with peanut sauce and sweet cucumber dip.

“Chicken Teriyakiis” served over a bed of lettuce ans sprinkled with sesame seeds.

Todmon Fried Chicken” is a Chicken pancake that is marinated with shrimp chili “paste, sliced green beans and lime leaves. It is served with sweet and sour sauce and cucumber dip.

They also serve a series of Thai rice noodle dishes such as Pad Thai, Thai Spaghetti and Pad Kee Mao. All of these dishes can be made with Tofo & vegetables, chicken, pork, beef, shrimp, and/or mixed seafood.

“Pad Tai” is a stir -fried recipe where Thai rice noodles are combined with eggs, scallions and bean sprouts and topped with ground peanuts.

“Thai Spaghetti” is a spicy rice noodle that is stir fried with eggs, tomatoes, peppers, scallions, basil in Thai chili sauce.

“Pad Kee Mao” is a large flat rice noodle that is stir fried with onions,  eggs, scallions, bell peppers, mushrooms, basil leaves, and served with a moderately spicy sauce.

I am especially fond or their soups. They are wonderful on a cool winter evening. They include: Tom Tom Kim, Tom Ka Kai, Wonton Soup, Veggie soup, and Beef or Chicken Noodle soup.

“Tom Tom Kung Soup” is made with shrimp, lemongrass broth, baby corn, lime juice, mushrooms and tomatoes.

“Tom Ka Kai Soup” has the creamy taste of coconut milk and is seasoned with galangal, lemongrass, baby corn, mushrooms and cilantro.

“Wonton Soup” is a clear chicken broth that is filled with marinated chicken and vegetables that are wrapped in a wonton skin.

” Wonton Soup” Is a delicious clear vegetable broth that has assorted vegetables and diced tofu.

“Thai style Noodle soup” contains chicken, shrimp and bean sprouts in their famous Thai clear broth.


Cape Cod's Stowe Room, A
Harriet Beecher Stowe room
Cape Cod's Roosevelt Room, B
Cape Cod’s Roosevelt Room, B

While all of the bedchambers at the Palmer House have their own romantic charm suitable for relaxation after the most wonderful day sampling Cape Cod’s cuisine, we recommend the Harriet Beecher Stowe room, the Theodore Roosevelt room or the Emily Dickinson room. These rooms feature comfortable king beds, fireplaces, jacuzzi-style tubs for a relaxing stay before and after your day.

Crape Cod

Chalkboard menu at Crepe Cod

Falmouth’s “Restaurant Row” just keeps getting better. We now have a wonderful French cafe, Crepe Cod, that serves the most delectable crapes, soups, smoothies,  and salads. That is not to mention their mouth watering Moroccan confections.

Crape Cod
Upon occasion Magali, the chef, will venture into the dining room, to offer suggestions and advice.

Crape Cod is an authentic French creperie. The owners are Magalie and Jaafar Chbarbi. Magalie is in the kitchen and Jaafar runs the dining room. Because most Americans are not familiar with the world of crapes, each table is adorned with the framed  history of the crape and its uses.

They explain that Crape is a French word that means pancake.  However, crapes are thinner than our traditional American pancakes and they are made with wheat flour. They originated in Brittany in the 12th century and now are considered France’s national dish.

Savory and sweet make up the two types of crapes. The savory is known as galettes but the sweet are more familiar to most diners. Savory crapes are made from buckwheat or sarrasin flour and sweet crapes are made from white flour. Savory crapes are healthier and are higher in fiber and are an excellent source of protein. They also contain all eight amino acids and are gluten free.

It is a tradition in Brittany for crapes to be served with local cider.  Brittany cider is dryer and sharper than the traditional British cider. The locals pour it into clay cups and enjoy it with their crapes.

Crape Cod is conveniently located at 649 Main Street and is just a ten minute walk from the Palmer House Inn. The interior design is quintessentially French modern. It is open daily for lunch and dinner. They also have an extensive wine list.

For more information:

crapecodcafe@gmail.com

www.crape-cod.com

649 Main Street

Falmouth MA 02540

774 763 2570

 


Cape Cod's Stowe Room, A
Harriet Beecher Stowe room
Cape Cod's Emily Dickinson Room Five
Cape Cod’s Emily Dickinson Room Five

While all of our guestrooms have their own charm suitable for relaxation after the most wonderful day of adventures on Cape Cod, we recommend the Harriet Beecher Stowe room, the Theodore Roosevelt room or the Emily Dickinson room. These rooms feature comfortable king beds, fireplaces, jacuzzi-style tubs and a relaxing stay before and after your day.

The Brewster General Store

sweets Brewster General Store

By Pat O’Connell Photos by Pat O’Connell

The Brewster General Store was built at Carlton E. Sears Square, as a church in 1852 by the Universalist Society, at a cost of $5,000. The congregation declined because of the Civil War and the building and property were sold in 1866 for $1.00. At that time it became a store. The new owner removed the steeple and the front portico and installed a front porch and large display windows. At that time a second floor was created and it was known as “The Hall”. The Hall was a place where social events such as dances and plays took place. Exciting things were happening in Brewster in 1866. That was also he year that the Old Colony Railroad came to town.  In order to best serve his customers, the owner delivered goods to towns people in a covered horse drawn wagon. This delivery service continued into the twentieth century and the Brewster General Store has been selling provisions and assorted merchandise to folks ever since.

Brewster General Store

The store is also a museum of sorts and a town meeting place. It has been visited by many famous people such as Horacio Alger and Helen Keller to name but a few. However, the store owes its long popularity to the thousands of summer and year round residents of the Cape who have passed through its doors during the past one hundred and fifty years. They have purchased groceries and household items in addition to meeting with friends and neighbors to catch up with local news. It is one of the oldest continually running stores on Cape Cod and one of the few authentic general stores in the northeastern United States.

The Brewster General Store is a beloved reminder of a bygone age. It is a story of survival and a tribute to local history. As you enter the main door and look around you will see a few hints of the store’s colorful past. The maple floors creek, there is a nickelodeon and an old post office. The blue check curtains in the front windows make you think of the nineteenth century.  As you ascend the turning staircase, be sure to notice the original church’s arched windows.

In New England during colonial times, churches or meeting houses as they were called, served as the political, social and religious centers of rural communities such as Brewster. From the landing of the Mayflower to the Revolutionary War, weekly church attendance was mandatory. However, as secular governments emerged, the dominance of the churches subsided and the general store became the meeting place.

furnace Brewster General Store
Furnace

The store was at one time the town’s hardware store and Post Office but that is no longer the case. Nor does it carry the vast selection of foods that it once did but it is still a friendly place where you can go in the morning and linger by a coal burning stove in the winter and drink a cup of freshly roasted coffee while you chat with neighbors. During the summer months you can stop by for an ice cream cone at the Brewster Scoop next door. During the warm weather folks sit on the outside benches and chat.

If you are planning a visit to Cape Cod, be sure to schedule in a visit to this charming old place. It is an hour’s drive from the Palmer House Inn and a great stopping place while on your way to Provincetown.


Cape Cod's Stowe Room, A
Harriet Beecher Stowe room
Cape Cod's Roosevelt Room, B
Cape Cod’s Roosevelt Room, B

While all of the bedchambers at the Palmer House have their own romantic charm suitable for relaxation after a wonderful day of Cape Cod adventures, we recommend the Harriet Beecher Stowe room, the Theodore Roosevelt room or the Emily Dickinson room. These rooms feature comfortable king beds, fireplaces, jacuzzi-style tubs for a relaxing stay before and after your day.