Fantastic Cape Events This Fall

3 Fantastic Cape Events this Fall in Falmouth, Cape Cod.

3 Fantastic Cape Events This Fall

Festivals, fine music, and frights for everyone.

3 Fantastic Cape Events this Fall in Falmouth, Cape Cod.
3 Fantastic Cape Events this Fall in Falmouth, Cape Cod.

Scallop Fest 2015, September 18, 19, 20, 2015

Scallops by the sea, Cape Cod
Scallops by the bay.

50,000+ Patrons over 3 fun-filled days! Famous Fried Scallop & Herb Roasted Chicken Dinners, a Food Court – Beer & Wine, Chowder, Lobster Rolls, Raw Bar, Hotdogs, Burgers, Salads, Wraps, Fried Dough, a Juried Arts & Craft Show, Fantastic Entertainment, an Inflatable Ride Park & Obstacle Course, and more. Held at the Cape Cod Fairgrounds, just 15 minutes from the Palmer House Inn.

www.scallopfest.org

JazzFest Falmouth, September 26 – October 4

JazzFest Falmouth
JazzFest Falmouth

Our second fantastic Cape event this Fall is wonderful, JazzFest Falmouth, an eight-day celebration of a uniquely American art form presented by ArtsFalmouth. There will be lectures, recitals, concerts, a Jazz Stroll, a Jam Session, and a jazz brunch. 

We will have cranberry oatmeal cookies and cider as afternoon refreshments. By the way, the Friday evening entertainment starts at the Queen’s Buyway shops with entertainment in the shops. Then they stroll past the Palmer House to the Museums on the Green where there will be more entertainment, then down to Main Street for an evening where the shops stay open late with entertainment.

www.jazzfestfalmouth.org

Falmouth Village of Scarecrows, October 2015

Each fall for the last few years, one by one the scarecrows begin appearing throughout Falmouth Village, MA.  See if you can find all them all. We’re also looking forward to Falmouth’s annual Halloween festivities: the Trick or Treat Stroll, A Visit with the Night Watchman at the Museums on the Green, and Halloween Spooktacular at Highfield Hall.

Falmouth Village of Scarecrows, Palmer House
Falmouth Village of Scarecrows, Palmer House

 


Cape Cod's Stowe Room, A
Harriet Beecher Stowe room
Cape Cod's Roosevelt Room, B
Cape Cod’s Roosevelt Room, B

While all of the bedchambers at the Palmer House have their own romantic charm suitable for relaxation after the most wonderful day of adventures on Cape Cod, we recommend the Harriet Beecher Stowe room, the Theodore Roosevelt room or the Emily Dickinson room. These rooms feature comfortable king beds, fireplaces, jacuzzi-style tubs for a relaxing stay before and after your day.

Cape Cod’s Three Sisters & Nauset Lighthouses

Nauset Lighthouse

The Three Sisters and Nauset Lighthouses

Nauset Lighthouse
Nauset Lighthouse
Three Sisters Lighthouses
Three Sisters Lighthouses

In 1836, Eastham locals approached the Boston Marine Society about building a lighthouse in the middle of Nauset coastline to help to guide shipping vessels to navigate through the dangerous waters. Nauset was once the name given to the area of land that stretched fifteen miles between what is now Brewster and Truro, two lower Cape Cod towns. The following year, in the spring of 1837, ten thousand dollars was appropriated to build a lighthouse station on Nauset Beach in-between the Highland Light in Truro and the Twin Lights in Chatham.

Lighthouse Door
Lighthouse Door

In order to distinguish it from other locations, it was decided that there would be three light towers instead of one or even two as in Chatham. Construction of the towers was completed by Winslow Lewis. In thirty-eight days, Lewis finished the 15-foot cone shaped towers. The identical structures were positioned in a straight line with 150 feet of separation between each one. They were all equipped with fixed white lights. Lewis had also built a small, brick home for the keeper of the triplet set of lighthouses. The Lighthouses would soon earn the name “The Three Sisters of Nauset” because of an abstract resemblance to three women in white dresses wearing dark black hats.

Three Sisters Lighthouse Light
Three Sisters Lighthouse Light
Lighthouse Window and Park
Lighthouse Window and Park

By the late 19th century, many changes would begin to occur to the Three Sisters Lighthouses. In 1873 authorization for an assistant keeper was put through along with the installation of fourth-order Fresnel lens, for the Sisters. A second home was then built on the property in 1876 to house the assistant keeper and have him closer to his duties. However, during these superficial changes to the lights and management, detrimental weather and erosion were forcing the three structures closer and closer to the water’s edge. Inevitably, the Three Sisters would either have to be moved or rebuilt to avoid the appetite of the angry sea. In 1892, three new 22-foot wooden towers were erected approximately thirty feet west of the Lighthouses original locations. However, the erosion continued to eat at the land and by 1911 the shoreline was only a mere eight feet from one of the towers. Rebuilding all three towers for a third time was deemed a waste of time, money, and effort so the decision was made that there would be only one lighthouse residing on Nauset Beach. After the towers were once again moved, the middle tower was chosen to shine on and it was attached to the original keeper’s house. The lone working lighthouse now flashed its white light three times every ten seconds into the open waters of the Atlantic Ocean.

Nauset Lighthouse
Nauset Lighthouse
Nauset Lighthouse Out Building
Nauset Lighthouse Out Building

In 1918, the two unused towers were purchased by the Cummings family for a grand total of $3.50. The family converted the structures into a summer home. During this time, the Chatham Light Station was also downgraded to one light. Chatham’s second light was then transferred to Eastham to replace the remaining wooden sister and act as the new Nauset Lighthouse. The last of the sisters was then sold for $10.00 and was converted into a private residence. The replacement tower, standing 48 feet tall and made of cast-iron, was given a makeover in the 1940’s to increase daytime visibility. It’s upper half was painted a rich red and the bottom half remained bright white, creating a memorable presence and ultimately a famous Cape Cod landmark. In 1955, The Coast Guard automated the light and sold the keeper’s house privately. The Lighthouse’s fourth-order Fresnel lens was then replaced in 1981 with aero beacons and the tower now flashed alternating red and white lights every five seconds. Today, one can see the old Fresnel lens on display at the Cape Cod National Seashore’s Salt Pond Visitor Center. Unfortunately, the new Nauset Light began to face complications with erosion, and after that threat it was decommissioned in 1993. At that time, the Nauset Light Preservation Society was formed. The society was given a five year lease on the Lighthouse and by 1996, the new site, far enough away from the water, was ready to house Nauset Light. In early 1997, the light was lit again.

Nauset Lighthouse Light
Nauset Lighthouse Light

After taking over ownership in 2001, the National Seashore came up with an agreement with the Nauset Light Preservation Society which allows the NLPS to continue to operate the light as a private aid to navigation. They are also responsible for all maintenance needed on both the tower and oil house.

Throughout the years, the National Park Service bought the entire set of the still-standing Three Sisters and by 1965 they were reunited on Cable Road. Restoration on the old landmarks began and upon completion in 1989, the new home for the Three Sister Lights was open for tours. The Three Sisters National Park site is now open to the public and tours of the towers are offered from the spring until the fall.

Nauset and The Three Sisters lighthouses are a pleasant hour and a half drive from the Palmer House Inn. The Three Sister’s site is a lovely location for a Cape Cod picnic.


Cape Cod's Stowe Room, A
Harriet Beecher Stowe room
Cape Cod's Roosevelt Room, B
Cape Cod’s Roosevelt Room, B

While all of our rooms have their own individual charm suitable for relaxation after the most wonderful day of adventures exploring the historic lighthouses of Cape Cod, we recommend the Harriet Beecher Stowe room, the Theodore Roosevelt room or the Emily Dickinson room. These rooms feature comfortable king beds, fireplaces, Jacuzzi-style tubs and a relaxing stay before and after your day.


Mary Moran is a Falmouth native and knowledgable about Cape Cod. In addition to writing for the Palmer House Inn, she’s also frequently at the inn and available to answer quest’s questions. She enjoys reading, hiking, and spending time exploring Falmouth’s coastal waterways.

Blizzard of 2015

Falmouth Main St in snow
Falmouth Main St in snow blizzard of 2015
Falmouth’s Main Street

The National Weather Service predicted a “potentially historic blizzard” to hit eastern Massachusetts, the Cape and Islands starting on Monday night and continuing into Wednesday.

On Monday I decided to do a narrative of the blizzard of 2015’s progress at the Palmer house Inn and in Falmouth Village.

The area was under a Blizzard Watch and the National Weather Service predicted that some areas may get as much as two feet of snow. The service said, “To put that into perspective, that is more than half of what Boston gets in an average winter.”

“Travel may become impossible and life threatening across the entire region. This has the potential to be a historic storm.”

Monday night through Tuesday afternoon was predicted to be the worst of the storm. Our area could experience white-out conditions during the height of the blizzard.

The snow was forecast to be wet and heavy and could cause power outages due to downed trees and electric lines.

Along with the heavy snow we are having damaging winds with gusts 60-70 mph. The prediction was that there would be moderate coastal flooding. Fortunately the Palmer House Inn is 18′ above sea level so we will not have a problem in that department.

Pete Bouchard who is with Channel 7 news in Boston said, ” Fifteen  to twenty-four inches of snow across the entire region is likely except for the Cape, which will get closer to a foot of snow.”

Boston’s Channel 7 News said the top snowstorm in Boston on record was 27.5 inches during a storm on Feb. 17-19, 2003.

Bouchard said there could be major flight delays and cancellations and suggested people leave on Sunday or early on Monday if possible.

“Don’t take this one lightly. Tempests like this only come around once in a while. Heed the advice of the authorities and chill out at home,” said Bouchard.

It is now 11:30 am on Monday January, 26th. I have just come back from a stroll to Main Street and the first flakes are beginning to fall.

By 2:00 pm on the 26th. Governor Baker declared eastern Massachusetts to be in a state of emergency and he issued a travel ban to begin at midnight. There was only about an inch of snow on the ground at that time, however, it was beginning to accumulate rapidly.

At 5:00 pm or sundown the snow depth was only 3″ when we went out to dinner, however, when we walked out of Anejo at 7:00 pm there was 6″ on the sidewalk. The forecasted high winds had not started, however, the snow is wet and heavy. That is one of the disadvantages of living close to the ocean. Our plow man is lined up to come in the morning. All is well.

After we were snugly settled in our Owners’ Quarters at the Palmer House Inn the wind began to blow with great gusts. It continued to blow through the night. At 5:30 am, I was awakened to the sound of honking geese. During a major storm like this one the Canada Geese gather in open fields and at dawn they sound the alarm. They were in a nearby school playground. We had over a foot of snow at that time and the prediction is that the storm will linger into tomorrow. It is difficult to tell how much snow has fallen because of the drifting.

The news channels say that there are over  10,000 households without electric power on Cape Cod. The towns include Provincetown and the entire island of Nantucket. We are lucky, we still have electricity.

At 4:00 pm, the snow was falling at a rate of 2″ per hour and the wind gusts had increased. The snow has been drifting in fanciful forms and the forecasters say that it will continue throughout the night. I wanted to go out to take some photos on Main Street but it was too dangerous. The Governor’s travel ban was not lifted until 12:00 am.

The wind gusts and snow stopped some time during the night, then the temperature dropped. When I went outside to take photos at 7:00 am, the temperature was 13 degrees and the wind was blowing steadily out of the west. Our electricity was uninterrupted. It is difficult to tell because of the drifting but my best guess is that we got about 30″ of snow.

All of the stores on Main Street were closed yesterday. That is the first time in the ten years that we have owned the Palmer House Inn. As I walked down the street people were beginning to dig out. The town was coming alive.  Two more storms are predicted for Thursday and Sunday of this week.

This has been quite an adventure and it is only January.