Ben & Bill’s Chocolate Emporium

Ben and Bill's
Ben and Bill's
Ben and Bill’s

Ben & Bill’s Chocolate Emporium is a small family of chocolate and ice cream shops in Massachusetts and Maine. They use family recipes that have been passed down from generations and offer the finest ingredients available. They also guarantee you the freshest, most delicious hand-made candies. In the summer this is the place to be for ice cream and one of our favorite Cape Cod sidewalk cafes. Sitting with a sugar cone watching people go by is a fantastic way to spend the afternoon.

Located at the intersection of Main Street and Walker Street, Ben & Bill’s Chocolate Emporium is in the heart of this small village.

Ben & Bill’s Chocolate Emporium

209 Main St.
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-7878
www.benandbills.com

 


Cape Cod's Stowe Room, A
Harriet Beecher Stowe room
Cape Cod's Roosevelt Room, B
Cape Cod’s Roosevelt Room, B

While all of our rooms have their own romantic charm suitable for relaxation after the most wonderful day of adventures, chocolate, and ice cream, we recommend the Harriet Beecher Stowe room, the Theodore Roosevelt room or the Emily Dickinson room. These rooms feature comfortable king beds, fireplaces, jacuzzi-style tubs and a relaxing stay before and after your day.

3 Great Summer Monday Events in Falmouth, Cape Cod

3 Great Summer Monday Events in Falmouth, Cape Cod

Three wonderful Falmouth Village venues have teamed up to create one great series of evening events on Mondays this summer. The series will begin on Monday, July 7th and will conclude on August 18th.

3 Great Summer Monday Events in Falmouth, Cape Cod
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3 Great Summer Monday Events

  1. Photograph Copyright (c) L.V.O'Connell 2009. All Rights Reserved.
    Conant House Museum

    The first location is “Falmouth Museums on the Green“. They will be open late from 5:00 to 7:00 pm – a perfect time to step out for a little historic town culture. The Falmouth Historic Society is the overseer of the Museums. The society was established in 1900 and its mission is to preserve and present the town’s history and share that history with the public. The museum buildings  are located across from the Falmouth Village Green at 55-65 Palmer Avenue and a few steps from the Palmer House.

    The buildings on the Museums’ campus include two historic homes, the Conant House that was built in 1730 and the (Dr. Joseph) Wicks House that was built in 1790. The Wicks House is a hansom example of Federalist Period architecture. There are also lovely colonial style flower gardens and a kitchen herb garden.  The third building on the campus is the Visitor Center or the rustic Hallett Barn and the adjacent Cultural Center. The barn has a charming gift shop and it is where tours begin. Tour guides will be present to direct visitors around the to the buildings. The two major exhibits this summer are “Victorian Life in Falmouth” and “Expressions in Stitches – Then and Now”. Admission is free.

  2. First Congregational Church Spire
    First Congregational Church Spire

    The second Summer Monday evening event will be “Hyannis Sound” at the First Congregational Church at 68 Palmer Avenue. The shows begin at 7:00 pm.”Hyannis Sound” consists of ten young men with the voices of angels who sing popular music, a cappella. As one might imagine the music is filled with the youthful energy and the harmony is wonderful. Their choice of music spans the decades. “Hyannis Sound” is a semi-professional singing group the men come from around the United States and convene each summer on Cape Cod. Their signature preppy look, of pastel shirts and ties with khakis, is created with the help of “Vineyard Vines” a local clothing store. Tickets are sold at the door and are $5.00 for children and $12.00 for adults.

  3. Cape Cod event: Lobster on the lawn
    Lobster on the Lawn

    The third, and arguably the tastiest Summer event, is at Saint Barnabas Church’s “Lobster on the Lawn”. The brown bag dinner begins at 5:00 pm. The meal consists of a lobster roll, chips and your choice of beverage.   For desert, a slice of pie. The price is $15.00 and there is also an appropriately priced child’s meal.  The proceeds go to their food pantry to feed the homeless.

After enjoying all 3 great summer Monday events, stroll down Falmouth Village’s  charming Main Street to shop in  unique shops or have a relaxing night-cap at one of our fine eateries on Main Street’s Restaurant Row. Many of the restaurants have sidewalk dining under the stars.

To conclude your evening, walk back to the Palmer House Inn where you can relax on the veranda rocking chairs while sipping a cool beverage before retiring to your bed chamber where your bed has been turned down and delightful Cape Cod chocolates await.

 


Cape Cod's Stowe Room, A
Harriet Beecher Stowe room
Cape Cod's Roosevelt Room, B
Cape Cod’s Roosevelt Room, B

While all of the bedchambers at the Palmer House have their own charm suitable for relaxation after the most wonderful day of adventures, we recommend the Harriet Beecher Stowe room, the Theodore Roosevelt room or the Emily Dickinson room. These rooms feature comfortable king beds, fireplaces, jacuzzi-style tubs for a relaxing stay before and after your day.

Cape Cod Meets Super Blizzard Nemo

Snow on the front walk of the Palmer House

We survived Blizzard Nemo with a bit of damage to the trees, and Cape Cod survived too.

Snow on the front walk of the Palmer House
A snow-covered front walk.

When the snow started on Friday morning it was light at first and the flakes were very small. That is usually an indication that a significant storm is in the offing.  As the day progressed, the snow was mixed with rain and by evening we had near white-out conditions. Throughout the night the wind was blowing wildly. It was in the morning when the storm was tapering off, as we walked the property, that we saw how much damage had been done. Bill has called a man with a plow but it is doubtful that he will be here today.  Almost half of the homes in Falmouth are without power and we have had many calls from people who are looking for warm rooms. We wish that we could help but we are “Snowbound”.

Snow on the Cape Cod B&B sign
Snow on the B&B sign.

I grew up in Haverhill, Massachusetts which is a little over a hundred miles north of Falmouth. Our home was a beautiful per-revolutionary colonial, in the section of the town known as Rocks Village. The house was built on the banks of the Merrimack River in 1774. The village was just a few miles from John Greenleaf Whittier’s homestead. One of Whittier’s best known poems was “Snowbound”. It was written about a massive storm that hit New England when he was a boy in the early eighteen hundreds. In the poem he talks about the snow being so deep that it almost reached the second story windows of his home. They were safe and warm in the house but they could not get to the barn to feed the animals. They decided to dig a tunnel through the snow to  get to the barn. The poem tells about that project.

Snow covered tree at a Cape Cod B&B
Snow covered tree.

Thinking about that long past dilemma and how it was solved, helps to put our plight into perspective. The Whittiers did not have to think about air travel, automobiles, electricity, snow plows or oil deliveries. Our lives are very different in the twenty-first century. Cape Cod usually does not get much snow. In fact last year we had little more that just a few dustings. That is what we get used to. Most of the towns on the Cape do not have town plows. Those of you who are familiar with New England  winters know that the snow removal fleet is an important item on each town or city’s budget. Traditionally, on the Cape, we get so little snow that our towns call upon local private contractors to do the job when needed. This storm is living up to its billing. It is a very heavy wet snow. We have sustained a lot of damage to our trees and shrubs. Bill is outside with the snow-blower working on clearing the walkways. We have been in contact with a plowing service to have the lot cleared, however, he could not give us a time when he could get here. We have had many calls today from folks in town who do not have electricity and need a warm place to stay but we cannot take guests until the lot is clear.

We’ll be digging out, shoveling the steps and preparing warm breakfasts for our guests. It will be a wonderful winter wonderland for a while. We always enjoy the cozy fires when we have a good snowfall. We’ll have a warm fire waiting for you in the parlor and a truely romantic fire in the Harriet Beecher Stowe room, the Theodor Roosevelt room and the Emily Dickinson room.